Vintage Costume Jewelry Value

Collecting costume jewelry can be addictive. The styles, colors, and designs are remarkably beautiful and once you start you may not be able to stop.

Costume jewelry is defined as jewelry made from non-precious materials. It was popular throughout the 20th century but its heyday was really in the 1950s and 1960s.

Collecting costume jewelry could be addictive. The styles, colors, and designs are remarkably beautiful and when you start you may not be able to stop. Area of the allure lies in the fact that it harkens back to a time when women really dressed up. Great thought was put in looking polished and put together, along with a beautiful piece of costume jewelry was often considered an ideal finishing touch.

Vintage Costume Jewelry

Vintage Costume Jewelry

History of Vintage Costume Jewelry

Vintage costume jewelry produced from the late 1800s up to the 1960s and beyond is very collectible today, as well as very wearable. Women add vintage rhinestone brooches to winter coats, hats as well as at the waist of dresses. Jewelry boxes are filling with styles from the past to become worn today – anything from funky bangles from the 1960s to vintage hat pins and stylish pearl necklaces.

Originally costume jewelry was not intended to last. Pieces were inexpensive and were designed to go with each season’s new outfits. The thinking behind it was that women could replace items as frequently as they replaced their clothes, with few financial repercussions. As a result, vintage costume jewelry is representative of fashion trends throughout the century. Little did anyone know at that time that the quality would hold up and a large number of pieces would survive and be quite collectible.

Jewelry Design

Paste jewelry was often more innovative in design than precious jewelry. Materials were softer and less expensive so it was easier for designers to consider risks. As a result, pieces were often opulent, glamorous, and quirky.

Value Collectible Costume Jewelry

The collector who would like to buy and sell can find and value collectible costume jewelryusing online research. EBay is the best place to investigate for most antique items. Keep in mind, an antique is just worth as much as someone wants to pay for it and EBay’s

Jewelry Design

Jewelry Design

auction format often proves this old theory.

When searching for pieces on eBay, follow the links until “vintage lots” appear. Then search the finished items. This will give the collector or seller a great sense of what the piece may be worth. There are generally many pages for each signature piece. While eBay has its own ups and downs when it comes to the going rates for things and therefore not always an accurate measurement, will still be a good learning tool.

Where to locate Collectible Costume Jewelry

The best places to find collectible costume jewelry to resell reaches estate auctions, yard sales, flea markets and thrift shops. These are the places where the best deals are available. Buying at antique shops and vintage clothing shops to resell may not be worth the cost. Occasionally, an individual can find a vintage lot on eBay in a reasonable price, but deals are rare. There’s stiff competition for good lots which include signed pieces.

Popularity of Paste Jewelry

The popularity of vintage costume jewelry is continuing to grow quite a bit over the last fifteen years. This is often seen by the large number of Websites that have been popping up. It’s also become popular on fashion runways. In 2004 particularly, vintage brooch sales soared also it seemed as though every fashionista around was sporting one. Wearing vintage costume pieces definitely constitutes a statement and you’re unlikely to determine two people wearing the same piece.

Author: collectiblesxgifts

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